Target Talent Like A Sniper On Facebook

TargetFacebook is fairly tough to search so it doesn’t get too much press from the sourcing community. Facebook is, however, one of the largest people databases on the web with 901 million monthly active users at the end of March 2012. Facebook also holds an unfathomable amount of information about its users.

Recent studies have shown that clicks on Facebook advertising have increased 50% in the last 12 months. Facebook advertising budgets are also increasing. This means that both users and advertisers are getting much more comfortable with the notion of advertising on Facebook. Users are more comfortable to click and advertisers are seeing the benefit.

Put these two things together and you have a very powerful and cheap way to get in front of exactly the kind of people you want to find to fill your job vacancies. I find myself recommending this to my clients more and more when they have very exact requirements to hunt down.

Clicks only cost a few pence, so if you target your ad at just a couple of hundred people you are unlikely to pay as much as one job posting on a job board. I’ve seen companies make placements for as little as £1.75 using Facebook Advertising.

Let me show you what I mean with an example.

Create your Facebook Ad

To start creating your Facebook Ad you will need to scroll to the very bottom of the page and click on “Advertising”.

Let’s suppose you want to find nurses to work at a hospital in Bristol. If you post your job on a job board it might cost hundreds of pounds and anyone might apply, even people that don’t have any relevant skills and qualifications or those that don’t live locally (people are funny that way).

Facebook Ads are very small, you have just a few characters and a picture to play with so make it punchy and very clear.

Advertise a job on Facebook

Target relevant Facebook profiles

Facebook lets you target your ad by location and by keywords. This means that only those likely to be interested and relevant for the role will see it. In this example I have also chosen to limit to those over 20, as you need a degree or a diploma to be a nurse.

Target by location and interests

Estimated reach of Facebook AdFacebook estimates that there are 1,240 people in the Bristol area aged over 20 that have the keyword “Nurse” or “Nursing” on their profiles.

You could also target your ad based on someone’s education. You could target all those in the Bristol area that have listed a nursing degree on their profile or those that say they work at other Bristol Hospitals. For this example, targeting those with a nursing degree worked better – the hospitals did not come up as workplaces, suggesting the people aren’t including this information on their Facebook profiles.

Target your Facebook add based on education and workplace

Target a small audience for cost effective recruitment on FacebookThese options give us a highly targeted audience of just 280 people on Facebook. This might seem like a small number but it is better to put your ad in front of a small number of relevant people rather than a large number of people that don’t fit your requirements.

If you wanted to reach more people you could increase this number to 400 people by extending your search to those up to 40km outside of Bristol.

Decide how much you want to spend on your Facebook advertisment

Facebook estimates a good maximum bid to be 45p – so even if you paid that for each click and everyone clicked on your ad, you’d spend a maximum of  £126. You can also cap your daily spend on adverting at a minimum of £1.

Advertising a job on Facebook won't cost you a lot.

I would recommend paying for advertising per click rather than per impression. This means that you only pay when someone clicks on your add, it might be displayed hundreds of time, providing you a good branding opportunity, for free!

Have you had any success with Facebook advertising?

Photo by gothick_matt on Flickr.

About TheSourceress

Katharine Robinson has written 98 post(s) for this blog.

Katharine (aka TheSourceress) began sourcing in April 2008 with a small Executive Search business specialising in Renewable Energy and, in March 2010, won the title of Grandmaster Sourcer at SourceCon in San Diego. Katharine has also worked in-house with Capgemini Consulting and is now working as a Freelance Consultant and Trainer.

Katharine (aka TheSourceress) began sourcing in April 2008 with a small Executive Search business specialising in Renewable Energy and, in March 2010, won the title of Grandmaster Sourcer at SourceCon in San Diego. Katharine has also worked in-house with Capgemini Consulting and is now working as a Freelance Consultant and Trainer.