The Sourcing Jigsaw

Studying the puzzle by Liza

I was having a conversation recently with a colleague and one of the things that really stuck out in my mind is that they said that I probably know more about the organisation than they do. Of course, being bashful, I brushed the comment off and just grinned. However, upon reflection there might be some truth in that statement.

I began to think about it and began to make the connections between recruiters and their stakeholder groups. If you think about it, usually recruiters have a set group of Business Units (BUs) that they service. As a result, they become very focused on specific skill sets. So how are sourcers different? Well, as a sourcer your portfolio of work is totally variable, you can expect to jump regularly from project to project all differing in BU’s, regions and specialisms.

Where does the skill factor come into play? Speaking to different BUs, you need to quickly get to grips with how they operate within the business/ greater market, how do they fit, whom are they dependant on and what intricacies are unique to your business unit that might not necessarily be reflective of the greater market? Once you know the answers to these questions, you can intelligently have conversations with the Line Manager/Recruiters about where to look and how to find these candidates. Never assume that recruiters and line managers are bad at candidate generation, but assume they are time “poor” and explore with them the avenues that they have not been able to cover. This involvement is crucial as they know their markets and can offer insight through their experience that otherwise means you might chase dead ends.

The skilled sourcer; aside from the actual candidate finding skills, needs a thorough understanding of levels and organisation structures and how they relate to their own business. This jigsaw can be very difficult to put together, especially if you do not know how everything within your own company fits. How could you possibly try to decipher another firm’s structure without a solid base of intelligence/knowledge?

This clarity will reap great benefits, especially once you are sourcing and identifying candidates. You can then visualise where they sit in other organisations and make educated assumptions. If you can’t answer basic questions about where people sit in a company, it usually means that they are not relevant. I have an example of this; I was doing a search for a specific type of actuary, however in all my searches a specific term kept coming up. I wrote an email to the Line manager and asked him what and where this term would normally be found. He explained to me that although I was on the right track, this term typically was related to a specific type of insurance that was not of particular interest for us. It was in fact a crossroads situation where actuaries chose to specialise more in one skill than the other. The point I am trying to make, is that I learned and identified an irrelevant skillset that would have skewed my results and ultimately wasted time.

On the flip side, this intelligence is not particularly useful to our recruiter as it is not part of the BU they are covering. It will go into my memory banks though, in case we ever need one of those special actuaries to fill in another piece of the bigger picture puzzle.

About Ralph Meyer

Ralph Meyer has written 6 post(s) for this blog.

Ralph has Over 8 years sourcing experience attained from both an agency and an in-house recruitment background. Having studied Marketing, Ralph quickly realized the correlation between marketing and recruitment. Seeking out specific candidates (target market) and approaching them in a bespoke and value added manner is paramount to success of any recruitment strategy. Using this knowledge he is currently a sourcing specialist that specializes in attracting executives and difficult to find skills set in the EMEA region. Colleagues would describe Ralph as “a bonkers sourcer whom is extremely creative and has an ability to spot and identify inroads into any market”

Ralph has Over 8 years sourcing experience attained from both an agency and an in-house recruitment background. Having studied Marketing, Ralph quickly realized the correlation between marketing and recruitment. Seeking out specific candidates (target market) and approaching them in a bespoke and value added manner is paramount to success of any recruitment strategy. Using this knowledge he is currently a sourcing specialist that specializes in attracting executives and difficult to find skills set in the EMEA region. Colleagues would describe Ralph as “a bonkers sourcer whom is extremely creative and has an ability to spot and identify inroads into any market”