Supercharge Your Twitter Use With Lists

Twitter buttons by Garrett Heath

Have you started using Twitter but unsure how to really get the most out of it for recruiting and business development purposes? Twitter Lists can really help you become a part of an engaged community.

Here are 4 types of list that can help you super-charge and focus your time on Twitter.

The Unmissable

There are some people whose tweets you have to see. You best friend, your mum (maybe), your clients, or breaking news about your favourite band (you wouldn’t want to miss gig tickets!). A list containing some or all of these people can help you check only the most essential tweets if you’re in a hurry.

In this category, I have a “VIPs” list for friends and family, a “Clients” list for those I work or have worked with and a “Doctor Who” list.

You might want to keep some of these lists set to private, especially the “Clients” one!

The Attention Grabber

If you want to grow a following on Twitter then you need to get people’s attention. Simply tweeting your guts out isn’t always enough.

You can of course follow lots of people and hope they will follow you back, but a high ratio of following to followers can look a bit desperate.

This is when I use lists.

Create a list and add the sort of people you would like to have as followers to it. I use this approach on the UK Sourcers Twitter account. I add any recruiters I come across on Twitter to a list called “UK Recruitment Types”. If they then check out the account and choose to follow, I make sure to follow back.

By their very nature, this type of list has to be set to public, rather than private, otherwise no one will know they’ve been listed.

The Networker

When you go to an event, the networking aspect can be tough for those of us that aren’t quite as extrovert as others. Run a search on the event name and the event #hashtag in the weeks ahead and build yourself a list of all the twitter users attending. That way you can get to know them and exchange tweets ahead of meeting in person.

There are a lot of events we can’t go to as well – time and money are not limitless. You can however use the same method as above to access those attending events, even when you can’t be there yourself.

It’s up to you if you want to keep your list private or make it public and benefit from “The Attention Grabber” effect too.

The Infiltrator

This type of list is really handy if you recruit people in a niche community.

Create a private list of people that work in your niche, have a particular job title, or who work for a competitor. Then visit that list on a regular basis and reply to its members’ tweets – but only if you have something worthwhile to contribute. Be helpful, insightful or funny and become a part of this community. Engaging out of work hours is particularly good – what do these people watch on TV? If you watch it too, you can join in with their tweets. These people are more than their job titles, in the same way that you are more than a recruiter.

The next time you mention a job that is relevant to this community, they will be far more likely to share it for you.

The Cuckoo

Don’t have time to raise your own chicks create your own lists? Use the lists that others have created.

You could pick interesting people and rifle through the lists they are on and the lists they have created (if any). This is great way to find similar profiles.

You can also use the site: search command with Google to search for interesting Twitter lists. Try a search string like this with your own keywords instead:

site:twitter.com inurl:lists inurl:code|programmers|java|ruby|rails|developers

or perhaps target people based on the lists they are a member of:

site:twitter.com inurl:memberships recruitment OR recruiting OR recruiter OR recruiters OR HR

Let us know, how do you use Twitter Lists for sourcing?

Image credit.

Boolean Tricks OR Treats

Cackling by sage_solar

As it’s Halloween, I thought I would use its most iconic phrase to demonstrate some Boolean search basics with Google Search.

Trick or treat

Halloween - tot1

This is probably the way Google expects us to search for this so it is probably the most visually pleasing set of results. Google will most likely be searching for both the words trick and treat on the pages, as we didn’t capitalise our OR, not making it a Boolean operator. Google does still highlight the or in results, clearly giving priority to the phrase “trick or treat”.

“Trick or treat”

Halloween - tot2

This set of results doesn’t look quite as pretty, Google probably doesn’t expect its average user to use quote marks when searching. It will be looking for the whole prase “trick or treat” so the results are similar to the last search. You will note that the estimated number of results for this search is less than the previous search. While these numbers should be taken with a pinch of salt, this is likely to be the case as the exact phrase will appear on fewer pages than simply both the words trick and treat.

Trick OR treat

Halloween - tot3

This search doesn’t make much sense in the context of Halloween. This searches for one or more of the words trick and treat. The results reflect this as the top two are definitions of the two words. You will also note that we have an estimate of many more results – obviously this is because we’ve been much less fussy with our search, any page that mentions either of the words trick or treat will satisfy this query.

Please note that I was logged in to Google when I ran these searches and yours might look totally different.

Image credit.

UK Sourcers News – 7th January 2013

UK Sourcers News

We have our second UK Sourcers Meetup this week. On Friday, Amazon will be hosting us at their new Development Center in London. We are delighted by the interest in these events and regret that everyone that requested a ticket did not get one – but by keeping the events small, we make sure everyone gets something out of it and has a chance to share.

Our second New Year Sourcing Assignment will be posted in the UK Sourcers LinkedIn Group on Thursday. This week we will be looking at improving the job ads we write with some great tips from Alastair Cartwright of Ingenium.

Toby Culshaw from Thales won our Christmas Sourcing Challenge! Well done Toby – we hope you enjoy your Cadbury’s Chocolate hamper from Sourcing Hat Ltd.

We posted a list of our top content from 2012 – have you missed any of it?

LinkedIn

Want to know who has viewed your LinkedIn profile? Here’s an interesting little “hack” from Life Hacker.

Have you clicked on a University name on a LinkedIn profile recently? An interesting feature that you might have missed.

Last week we asked if you are making the best use of links on your LinkedIn profile.

Social Media

We have a fresh Social Network Map of The World for 2013 – Facebook now dominates in 127 out of 137 countries.

World Map of Social Networks - January 2013

Search

10 Ways to Speed up and Beef up your Google Searches – Another useful list from Lifehacker.

Detailed clarification on some of the finer points of Google and Bing search syntax from Boolean Strings

Is there anything I have missed? Do let me know if there’s something you’d like me to share in a future News post.